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Trivia of the Day – Saturday, February 16th

The Packers tried to stop the 49ers with predictable results.

The Packers forgot to tackle the quarterback.

It’s hard not to be amazed by the seasons that Colin Kaepernick, Robert Griffin III and Russell Wilson had as first-year starters in 2012. It’s playing around with the cut-offs to an absurd degree, but prior to 2012, only six men in NFL history had ever:

  • Averaged 7.9 yards per attempt on at least 200 passes
  • Average at least 5.0 yards per carry on at least 50 rushes

You probably wouldn’t be surprised to know that Fran Tarkenton, Steve Young, Daunte Culpepper, Michael Vick, and Aaron Rodgers were five of the players to accomplish this feat. Then, in 2012, Kaepernick, Griffin, and Wilson joined the list, as did Cam Newton.

But can you name the remaining member of the 7.9/200/5.0/50 club?

Trivia hint 1 Show


Trivia hint 2 Show


Trivia hint 3 Show


Click 'Show' for the Answer Show

{ 11 comments }
  • Shattenjager February 16, 2013, 12:27 am

    Well, I thought I had it, but I should have realized Randall Cunningham would be far too easy. Once looking at the first hint and seeing that I was wrong, I went through a whole series of guys who I just didn’t think could be right (including Bobby Douglass–I thought there was no way that he could have averaged 7.9 y/a and wasn’t sure he ever threw 200 passes) and couldn’t come up with even a good guess until the final hint, when I did guess correctly without any confidence at all in the guess.

    That was a good question. It wasn’t impossible, but it wasn’t easy, either.

    Reply
    • Chase Stuart February 16, 2013, 12:24 pm

      Thanks.

      Reply
  • JWL February 16, 2013, 1:27 pm

    I got this one instantly.

    If you asked for all six guys I would have gone with Tarkenton, Staubach, Landry, Culpepper and Vick and then maybe would’ve been stumped by Rodgers. I would not have thought Young averaged 7.9 yards per attempt in any of his Buccaneers years.

    Reply
  • JWL February 16, 2013, 2:44 pm

    Something seems amiss.

    I have gone on to review the numbers.

    Tarkenton was a regular starter his rookie year.
    56 rushes, 5.5 avg
    280 passes, 7.1 ypa

    Staubach was a regular starter in 1971. He had one start in 1969 and three starts in 1970, so I guess we are to look at 1971 here.
    41 rushes, 8.4 avg
    211 passes, 8.9 ypa

    Landry started half the Lions games in 1969 and six in 1970, but if we consider 1971 to be his first year as the regular starter then he qualifies here.
    Landry in 1971-
    76 rushes, 7.0 avg
    261 passes, 8.6 ypa

    Culpepper started all 16 games in his second season and his two numbers were 5.3 and 8.3.

    Young started five games in 1985 and 14 in 1986. His ypa was under 7 in each season.

    Vick in 2002-
    113 rushes, 6.9 avg
    421 passes, 7.0 ypa

    Rodgers in 2008-
    56 rushes, 3.7 avg
    536 passes, 7.5 ypa

    It looks like Tarkenton, Landry and Culpepper qualify.
    Staubach, Young, Vick and Rodgers fall short one way or another.

    Or I did not read the question correctly.

    I would not have gone with Cunningham (if asked to name all six) because that 1986 Eagles offense stunk. Mike Quick and Kenny Jackson didn’t catch enough passes to help Ron Jaworski and Cunningham in the YPA department. The offense was mostly about short passes and getting sacked. I remember the late afternoon they played vs the Giants in New Jersey. Both QBs did nothing in the game. I do not quite recall whether Jaworski was pulled for poor play or a rough shot he took on a sack y Lawrence Taylor. I am pretty sure it rained in that game or at least in the 4th quarter. It was a dreary game all the way through for the Eagles.

    Reply
    • Danish February 16, 2013, 2:54 pm

      Vick qualifies in 2010 with 8.1 y/a on 372 passes, and 6.8 on 100 rushes.

      Reply
    • Danish February 16, 2013, 2:57 pm

      Oh I see the confusion.. I don’t think Chase meant it to be rookies (or first year starters) only.

      Reply
  • JWL February 16, 2013, 2:46 pm

    Uhh wait a minute. Tarkenton’s YPA was 7.1 so he does not qualify either as far as how I am interpreting this query.

    Reply
  • JWL February 16, 2013, 2:52 pm

    Think I figured it out now.

    It is at any point in the fellow’s career. I got thrown off by the “first year starter” phrase in the opening sentence.

    Tarkenton did have a 5.0/7.9 season at one point in his career.

    When I got Landry as an answer I was actually wrong because he did not have a 5.0/7.9 season in his first season with extended playing time.

    Reply
  • Tim Truemper February 16, 2013, 3:56 pm

    Got Landry on 2nd hint. Thought Staubach with the 1971 hint. But he only started fully 10 games as he finished the season and Dallas wins the SB. He had > 7.9 passing but did not reach the 50 carries mark (had 41). He did lead the league in passing! Fun question and nice to hear about Greg Landry of Detroit (plus you had another good trivia question- which two Detroit QB’s ever made the Pro Bowl?)

    Reply
  • Richie February 18, 2013, 8:10 pm

    The 1st hint gave me Landry. I figured Douglass couldn’t hit the Y/A threshhold.

    Reply
  • Gerald Boyd February 21, 2013, 4:27 pm

    I took this to mean those were the only quarterbacks to record those numbers in the same year during any point in their careers. I checked each one’s year totals and it seems Tarkenton had two years with those numbers (64 & 65), Culpepper had 2 years (2,000 & 2004), Rogers had 2 years (2009 & 2010), Cam Newton had 2 years (2011 & 2012)…but Steve Young easily had the most of anybody with 5 years. 1991 – 279 att. – 9.0 av., 66 runs – 6.3 av./ 1992 – 402 att.- 8.6 av., 76 runs – 7.1 av.,/1993 – 462 att.-8.7 av., 69 runs – 5.9 av./1994- 461 att.-8.6 av., 58 runs – 5.1 av./and 1998 – 517 att. – 8.1 av., 70 runs – 6.5 av. I’ve looked at other major quarterbacks such as Cunningham, Douglass, Staubach, Elway, Montana etc. and haven’t found any who qualify for all the variables such as the minimum 200 pass attempts & 50 carries.

    Reply

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